Background Information Old Testament New Testament New Testament (cont.) Gentile Period (cont.)
1-Biblical Jerusalem 16-Salem, Jebus 33-Ashlar Stones 51-Bethesda Pool 68-Saint Anne's Church
2-History of Jerusalem 17-Milo, Jebusite Wall 34-Temple Mount 52-Holy Sepulcher 69-Sultan's Pool
3a-Map of Today's City 18-Gihon Springs 35-NE of End of Wall 53-Garden Tomb 70-Citadel
3b-The Four Quarters 19-City of David 36-SE End of Wall 54-Fort Antonia 71-Colonnade Column
3c-Photos 20-David's Palace 37-Western Wall 55-Phasael Tower  
3d-Silwan 21-Temple Mount 38-West Wall Tunnel 56-Struthion Pool  
4-The Walls Today 22-Solomon's Walls 39-Mikvah, Ritual Baths 57-Gethsemane  
5-The Gates Today 23-Solomon's Quarries 40-The Large Mikvah 58-Tombs in Hinnom Miscellaneous
6-Archaeology Periods 24-Broad Wall 41-Wilson's Arch 59-Jerusalem Tombs Archaeological Finds
7-Archaeology History 25-Hezekiah's Tunnel 42-Warren's Gate Gentile Period Jason's Tomb
8-Old Ancient Core 26-Middle Gate 43-Barclay's Gate 60-Ecce Homo Lazarus' Tomb
9-Kidron Valley 27-Nehemiah's Wall 44-Robinson's Arch 61-Roman Inscription Tomb of David
10-Central Valley Hasmonean 45-Western Wall Street 62-Cardo Maximus Via Dolorosa
11-Hinnom Valley 28-Walls and Towers 46-Western Wall Shops 63-Roman Road Hezekiah's Pool
12-Mount of Olives 29-Aqueduct 47-South Temple Wall 64-Nea Church  
13-Mount Moriah 30-Acra 48-Archaeology Park 65-Al Aqsa Mosque  
14-Western Hill Mt Zion 31-Temple Mount 49-Siloam Road 66-Dome of the Rock  
15-Ophel 32-Tombs in Kidron 50-Siloam Pool 67-Temple Mount  
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46- Western Wall Shops

 

Shop fronts on the west side of the street. This is a close up of the front of the shops sitting along the Herodian road. Notice the nicely cut ashlar stones that
formed the door jambs and supported the lintels above the doorways. This street was lined with shops on both sides.

Shops to the west of the street can be seen in the top left of this photo.
Remains of shops built against the wall to the east of the street can be seen in the rubble to the right side of the street in the middle/right of the photo.

 


The remains of shop walls built against the Temple Mount wall can still be seen running perpendicular to the Temple Mount's west wall.
The shops on the west side of the street can be seen in the upper left corner.
The shop in the middle of the photo was a bakery where circular floor ovens were found.


Shops along the Herodian Street can be seen to the right of the curb. The lintels (top stone over the doorways)
of these shops provided support for Robinson’s Arch, which in turn supported the staircase that led to the
southwestern gate of the Temple Mount.

 


These are the remains of three or four of the shops on the east side of the pavement that were built perpendicular to the Western Wall. Crushed pavement
and curbs are seen in the bottom right quadrant of the photo.


A view from above looking at the southwest corner of the Western Wall. Notice the shops along the Western Wall and the stairs that begin at the base of the
southwest corner and go over the top of the shops.

Josephus’ Account of Jerusalem’s Destruction in 70 AD:

While the holy house was on fire, every thing was plundered that came to hand, and ten thousand of those that were caught were slain...children,
and old men, and profane persons, and priests were all slain in the same manner; so that this war went round all sorts of men, and brought
them to destruction, and as well those that made supplication for their lives, as those that defended themselves by fighting. The flame was also carried a long way, and made an echo, together with the groans of those that were slain. ...Nor can one imagine any thing either greater or more terrible than this noise; for there was at once a shout of the Roman legions, who were marching all together, and a sad clamor of the seditious, who were now surrounded with fire and sword....Yet was the misery itself more terrible than this disorder; for one would have thought that the hill itself, on which the temple stood, was seething hot, as full of fire on every part of it, that the blood was larger in quantity than the fire, and those that were slain more in number than those that slew them; for the ground did no where appear visible, for the dead bodies that lay on it; but the soldiers went over heaps of those bodies, as they ran upon such as fled from them....As for the priests, some of them plucked up from the holy house the spikes (18) that were upon it, with their bases, which were made of lead, and shot them at the Romans instead of darts. But then as they gained nothing by so doing, ...Now the Romans, judging that it was in vain to spare what was round about the holy house, burnt all those places, as also the remains of the
cloisters and the gates, two excepted; the one on the east side, and the other on the south; both which, however, they burnt afterward. They also
burnt down the treasury chambers, in which was an immense quantity of money, and an immense number of garments, and other precious goods ...before Caesar had determined any thing about these people, or given the commanders any orders relating to them, the soldiers were in such a rage, that they set that cloister on fire; by which means it came to pass that some of these were destroyed by throwing themselves down headlong, and some were burnt in the cloisters themselves. Nor did any one of them escape with his life. A false prophet was the occasion of these people's destruction, who had made a public proclamation in the city that very day, that God commanded them to get upon the temple, and that there they should receive miraculous signs of their deliverance. Now there was then a great number of false prophets suborned by the tyrants to impose on the people, who denounced this to them, that they should wait for deliverance from God; and this was in order to keep them from deserting, and that they might be buoyed up above fear and care by such hopes... Thus were the miserable people persuaded by these deceivers, and such as belied God himself.
- Wars of the Jews, book VI, chapter V

Now as soon as the army had no more people to slay or to plunder, because there remained none to be the objects of their fury, (for they would not
have spared any, had there remained any other work to be done,) Caesar gave orders that theyshould now demolish the entire city and temple, but
should leave as many of the towers standing as were of the greatest eminency; that is, Phasaelus, and Hippicus, and Mariamne; and so much of the
wall as enclosed the city on the west side. This wall was spared, in order to afford a camp for such as were to lie in garrison, as were the towers also
spared, in order to demonstrate to posterity what kind of city it was, and how well fortified, which the Roman valor had subdued; but for all the rest
of the wall, it was so thoroughly laid even with the ground by those that dug it up to the foundation, that there was left nothing to make those that came thither believe it had ever been inhabited. This was the end which Jerusalem came to by the madness of those that were for innovations; a city otherwise of great magnificence, and of mighty fame among all mankind. But Caesar resolved to leave there,
as a guard, the tenth legion, with certain troops of horsemen, and companies of footmen.
-Josephus, Wars of the Jews, book VII, chapter I.

 
 

 

   

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